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The ipd Racecar is Coming Back

Wednesday, May 19, 2010 - Richard Gordon - ipd founder

 

The ipd Racecar is Coming Back
      By: Richard Gordon - ipd founder

IPD’s founder, Richard Gordon and his son Robert Gordon are nearly finished with the restoration of ipd’s famous Volvo 142 race car. The car was retired from racing back in the mid 80’s and sat in storage for nearly 20 years. A couple of years ago Richard decided he wanted to restore it and have some fun competing in Vintage races. Finding parts for a 40+ year old Volvo can be a challenge, even for one of the owners of ipd. Finding race parts for a 40+ year old Volvo is down right difficult as Richard found out during the restoration, which has been ongoing for several years.

Richards story below is a brief recollection of the building and racing history of this car. Photos of the car in it’s current state as well as Richards racing plans for summer 2010 can be found below as well. Check it out!

We built the first 142 during the 1974-’75 winter and raced it from 1975 through 1979 when we sold it to Don Byer Volvo in Virginia. It was a good car and quite competitive in both SCCA  B-Sedan and the IMSA Champion Spark Plug Challenge. In the cars inaugral race at Laguna Seca in 1976, we led the first race we ran for about eight laps until a “trick” intake valve (purchased out of England) began to stretch and finally broke on lap 20. Another valve broke while practicing at Ontario Motor Speedway the following weekend. We patched together one good engine using components from the broken engines and went back to using our tried and proven ipd valves. We were so busy working on the engine we didn’t have time to change from the 4:56 rear-end gears. Ontario was like a freeway, more suited for 4:10 gears, so the race was a real test for the tachometer…and the engine. We actually didn’t think we’d even finish the race—starting near last—but ended up in 8th out of some thirty cars. To us, finishing 8th was like winning.

The new 142 was donated to us by a Swedish service shop in Seattle. I think the car started out as a 1967, but time has erased this from my memory. It had over a 100K on it and didn’t run, but the body and chassis were in good shape and that’s all we needed to get started on the replacement. In early Spring, my son Robert and I pulled an empty trailer behind our Dodge van to Seattle on a rainy (surprised?) early winter day; loaded the 142 on the trailer, thanked Odvar Ogland (Real name—owner of British & American Automotive which had morphed into a Volvo shop, too.) for donating the car and hauled it back to Portland.

We cut the top off and shipped it along with the hood, trunk lid, doors and fenders to a company if California and had them acid dipped which removed about fifty pounds (we weren’t allowed fiberglass parts in IMSA so we swapped the hood, fenders and trunk lid with fiberglass when we ran in SCCA).

The Volvo was almost always the heaviest car in its class—not necessarily by rules but because it was nearly impossible to get it down to legal racing weight. (It was a bit closer to legal weight in SCCA trim because—remember?—we could use fiberglass panels.)

A small steering wheel helped speed-up the steering at the expense of more muscle input. Window net and seat with approved 3” 5-point seat belts were installed. The driving seat was the best we could find at that time and served me well for many hours of racing.

 

 

 

We set-up four rear gear ratios and by having a common pinion gear depth on all sets, we could change ratios in about 30-40 minutes: 4:88, 4:56, 4:30 and 4:10.

We started with an M40 gearbox with close ratio gears, but that transmission didn’t hold up to the rigors of road racing. We began using an M45 gearbox from a 240 Volvo (with a special bell housing Volvo made for their rally teams) and their close ratio gear set. The transmission performed almost flawlessly for nearly four seasons of racing. The clutch was a 4-button metallic disc and an aluminum F&S pressure plate.

We used Stahl 4-1 headers with a 3” exhaust system and a small glass-pack muffler at the rear.

We ended up with about the same horse power and torque as the Webers and the EFI gave us the ability to adjust the fuel mixture from the driver’s seat. Reading exhaust gas temp gauges ( pyrometers) on cylinder #1 & #4 exhausts runners allowed us to dial in a precise air/fuel ratio.

At Laguna Seca in 1982 Richard Gordon’s ipd Volvo won the Champion Spark Plug Challenge race. The first ever professional road race victory for Volvo in North America!



After a long-time absence from racing the ipd 142 started its comeback. Robert Gordon stripped the car and repainted it, then it sat in my garage from 2001 through 2009; “Someday I’m gonna get that thing running again.” Well, after Alan Berry and Ole Andersson kept bugging me to get the car to Infineon (Sears Point to me) for the first West coast Volvo GP, I decided to lure some race crazies into coming over to my house and get the suspension on it and get it rolling so we could load it on a trailer. Robert actually led that charge. He talked a couple of his buddies into giving him a hand. We rolled it out of the garage and onto a trailer in January and it came to rest on a hoist at Vol-Tech, Robert’s shop in NE Portland.

The engine we used was a seasoned block and was removed to freshen up. We simply honed the bores and replaced the bearings and rings. Note the aluminum caps over the freeze plugs; we had a freeze plug pop out on the first lap in turn 4 at Laguna Seca in 1977 (“old 142) and the car slid out of control, hit the tire barrier and did a pirouette. I ended up in a choking cloud of dust and smoke. The car was all but destroyed. Luckily the twenty of so cars behind me that plowed into the dust didn’t t-bone me. From that time on, extra freeze plug insurance was implemented on every engine we built.

We disassembled the 3-piece Gotti alloy wheels, had them sandblasted and inspected, then clear-coated. Even though the original O-ring seals were still very supple, we still ran a strip of silicone where the halves bolt together. We will probably switch to 15” wheels, but to keep the car looking like it was last raced back in the ‘80s we decided to run these 14” Gotti wheels. In those days the best Goodyear slicks were available for 14” wheels. No, as we hear from Goodyear, they don’t even make a 14” slick anymore. We’ll probably run Hoosiers. As I write this the car is still on a hoist at Vol-Tech’s shop—sans the engine which we just got back from Schnell Automotive (on April 28, 2010). We still need to take to Malaya Signs to have the graphics added. We painted the side stripes on the last time, but this time, since we don’t have a paint booth, we’re going with Mylar tape. Our aim is to make it look like it did when it was raced in B-sedan. There’ll be some new sponsors on the sides since many of our old sponsors are no longer in business. We’re negotiating with Mt. Hood Motorsports; a small Portland company that sells used Volvos. Many ipd staffers (including me) have purchased a used Volvo from MHM. One longtime trusted cosponsor will be Red Line synthetic oil. Their product has proven itself race worthy by thousands of racecar owners.

Gallery

This is what the old, “old” ipd 142 looked like through the engine bay of the “new,” old 142.
We built rotisserie-like stands so we could rotate the body making it a whole lot easier to work on—especially welding.
Boxing in the upper and lower A-arms was critical to eliminate the flex under stress of heavy loading while cornering.
Spherical bearings were not allowed in IMSA so we compromised and used Delrin plastic to replace all the rubber bushings in the A-arms and upper and lower rear (above) control arms.
The electrical control panel housed all the switches: ignition, fuel pumps, start button, lights, and so on.
The panhard rod was lengthened and made adjustable.
We started with an M40 gearbox with close ratio gears, but that transmission didn’t hold up to the rigors of road racing. We began using an M45 gearbox (with a special bell housing Volvo made for their rally teams) and their close ratio gear set.
We used Weber 45dcoe carbs to begin with and then switched over the Bosch EFI since it was legal in both IMSA and SCCA.
Laguna Seca 1979: Leading B-Sedan, D-production race. Fading brakes caused me to slow-up near the end yielding 1st place
Laguna Seca 1982: Richard Gordon’s ipd Volvo wins the Champion Spark Plug Challenge race. The first—ever—professional road race victory for Volvo in North America.
Laguna Seca 1982: Richard Gordon’s ipd Volvo wins the Champion Spark Plug Challenge race. The first—ever—professional road race victory for Volvo in North America.
Still up on stands, but getting closer to rolling on its own again.
Rolling again!
Rolling again!
David Tow (front) discusses the rewiring challenge with Robert.
Before you have order, you first must have chaos.
The engine we used was a seasoned block and was removed to freshen up. We simply honed the bores and replaced the bearings and rings.
Fresh Zimmerman cross-drilled rotors and rebuilt calipers on the rear.
Fresh cross-drilled rotors on the front. Rebuilt calipers yet to be installed.
Since the old MICO master cylinder was frozen up, we decided to replace it with a new one. This is a two-stage cylinder allowing us to remove our vacuum brake boost system.
In the first instrument cluster we used a Smiths chronometric (mechanical). It looked neat, but it often needed drive-gear and cable service.
This is the original M45 gearbox we used back in the late ‘70s.
We had to replace the fuel cell because the old Simpson cell was fraught with decay—shot.
The engine sits in its place waiting to be fully dressed with its intake manifold and Stahl exhaust headers. Note: we don’t use the original oil filter. We drilled and tapped the block where we attached #10AN fittings and hoses which feed the MECCA remote
Vol-Tech prepared cylinder heads sport double valve springs, bronze valve guides and larger titanium valves. The head and the valves are the same ones over twenty years ago.
Two pyrometers wait to be reinstalled to monitor exhaust primary tubes #1 & #4. Keeping an eye on exhaust temperature can lead you to maximum power and prevent melting a piston.
A small Nippondenso—about the size of two fists—takes the place of the troublesome and expensive Bosch unit. We built some brackets to mount it on the driver’s side getting it away from the exhaust headers.
A new aluminum, larger capacity radiator replaced the old aluminum radiator which got damaged somewhere along the way.
The same gauge panel reinstalled with the new Auto meter tach. We also had David Tow build a new switch panel. No, we didn’t forget the steering wheel. David also built some relays into the panel which eliminated the original relays under the hood.
We disassembled the 3-piece Gotti alloy wheels, had them sandblasted and inspected, then clear-coated. Even though the original O-ring seals were still very supple, we still ran a strip of silicone where the halves bolt together.
At the 2010 IPD Garage Sale
At the 2010 IPD Garage Sale

Community Comments

Wednesday, May 19, 2010 - JASON VERALDI

Yeah, I want one. Build me a clone? Gotta love seeing Volvo racing heritage preserved.

Wednesday, May 19, 2010 - PHIL SALMON

So, is there any chance IPD might bring back more performance parts for these flying bricks?

Thursday, May 20, 2010 - ALDEN

What news letter is the rest of this story in? I can't seem to find it.

Monday, May 24, 2010 - ALBERTO AVERILL

Thanks again IPD friends Here in Chile several Volvo 142 are racing in vintage events and your vrry good tips certainly will help inprove our cars that obviously use IPD parts Alberto Averill President www.clubvolvochile.cl

Tuesday, May 25, 2010 - MICHAEL SMITH

That 142 is one bad ass racing machine!

Monday, May 31, 2010 - RAYMOND

Hi, it couldn't get more old school by the looks of it. Any info on the Nippondenso?

Thursday, June 3, 2010 - JAMES THOMAS

Richard and Rob, I love it. Rob is the one who got me into an ITB 142. I have been so successful with my car and am still racing it. I have 21 wins and two qualifying records at Laguna. I had the track record at Laguna but lost it but will try next weekend to regain it. I am two tenths off the lap record at Thunderhill and am going for that too. I am getting older (62 now) and to muscle that car around is always a challange, but I will not give up. Thanks Richard and Rob for getting me into this crazy business, really! James Thomas Chico,Ca. WWW.JTVOLVO.COM

Sunday, June 6, 2010 - ERIC T

This car is responsible for my interest in Volvos. I still have my first car, a '71 142 E that I towed home from my neighbor's house and reassembled with carbs. It's gold with a flat black hood, just like the car on the Volvo performance pats flyer from that time. I wish I had that flyer. I bought a pair of fiberglass front fenders on eBay a few years ago that the previous owner said were from the IPD car, it didn't matter to me - I wanted glass fenders. He said the hood was sold but the trunk lid might be available but then I never heard from him again. Anybody know where to get a glass hood and trunk lid?

Monday, June 14, 2010 - BILL MAHER

I still have the original 142 race car sold to byer back in 79. I have had it since 82 and still occasionally pull it out to instruct at schools at watkins glen or an occasional autocross. Hope to eventually return it to original instead of the present Red/White/Blue

Tuesday, June 15, 2010 - KURT OMENSETTER

I raced a 71 142E in SCCA, ITB class for 5 years. What a great car!!! Im still racing.....miss that car

Sunday, July 18, 2010 - REX MURPHY

I recall watching Richard race this car on several occasions. Does he recall the race at Sears Point where he was up against to hot shoes from back east in Renaults. He jumped them at the start but had a chromed wheel break in the carousel and I recall seeing that wheel flying in the air. I watched Rob win the first ITB race at Thunderhill and decided it was time to go racing. I was 62 at the time and I'd still be out there if I had a sponsor. Rob sold me some shocks and springs and I began building a car I bought for $50, a 1973 142. I campaigned that car for 6 years and had a ball. I was more successful when James Thomas walked up to my pit and began helping me. He unselfishly gave me hours of his time for several years till he got the bug and began building his own car. I will be at Thunderhill to watch Richard try out his restored 142 and demolish the competition. Sorry I wasn't able to stop and see you on my recent trip to the Northwest. Good luck

Sunday, August 8, 2010 - MARIANO GARCIA

My father and I still campaign a 72' 142e in Florida Region SCCA. The car is still competitive, providing many good memories. I like what you've done! All the best!

Monday, September 13, 2010 - DAN DEBELL

Great Car! I am very interested in more info on the common pinion depth that will allow gear changes quickly. Can you share more info? I run a 71 142E IN SCCA ITB. Long time customer of ipd. Keep up the good work.

Tuesday, March 22, 2011 - BOB FORD

Richard,hope you still remember me.I raced the volvo P1800 ON THE EAST COAST.The parts and information you provided me with was a great help. Glad to see the 142e is coming back.Look for the P1800 in vintage race events.Good luck and enjoy the ride.

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